The difference between men and women

Ben Reed —  June 13, 2013 — 6 Comments

If you’re married, or ever been in a relationship with someone of the opposite sex, you know that men and women communicate differently.

And I bet you’ve had an argument discussion that went something like this.

 

 

 

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Ben Reed

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Christ follower, husband, father, writer, small groups pastor at Saddleback Community Church. Communications director for the Small Group Network.
  • http://KCProcter.com/ ThatGuyKC

    What? No comments? Cowards.

    I LOVED this video. Not because my wife is like this, but in my 30 years I’ve talked w/ plenty of women like this (and men married to women like this).

    Yes, men need to be sensitive to the needs of their wives. Men need to listen and consider the value of emotions. Men need to understand what makes their wives tick and serve them as Christ loved the church.

    But sometimes, it’s just a nail that needs to be yanked out.

    • http://www.benreed.net Ben Reed

      So true, KC. Couldn’t agree more!

  • Nicholas Lenzi

    I see this problem more in my groups then I do in my marriage (maybe the nail is in my forehead). To often in group people are just blinded by the sin in their life to notice that it is what is causing the problem. Biggest nail I see is women who are dating ungodly men and wondering why they keep getting the same results.

    • Nicholas Lenzi

      …Also men and sexual integrity and the effects it has on their relationships.

      • http://www.benreed.net Ben Reed

        I’ve seen it in groups too, Nick. Good call. I like that angle.

    • Joe Klassen

      Nick you just defined insanity very well. Doing the same thing but expecting different responses. But I like what you said about people being blinded by their own sin. It is amazing how something that we can not or will not see often is so obvious to others. I think that sometimes the biggest issue is our unwillingness to stop rationalizing our own actions and call them what they actually are.