A world where content is not king

Ben Reed —  October 7, 2011 — 4 Comments

Photo: Creative Commons User: Polježičanin

Information isn’t the most important thing anymore. We live in a world where content isn’t king.

Right content is king.

Today, you can turn anywhere and find any answer to any question you can come up with.

Message ChaCha and within 60 seconds, you’ll have your answer. From a real person!

“Google” is a verb used in common language.

Information is abundant and around every corner. You can have nearly every major newspaper delivered wirelessly to your Kindle.

Our culture is on information overload. The answer is not found in more information.

The answer is in curating the right information.

Which explains the success of sites like Take Your Vitamin Z, Monday Morning Insight, and Between Two Worlds. This generation is not just looking for more information. We’re looking for the right information.

  • I don’t just care to go to a movie because it’s a big-budget blockbuster. I’ll go because someone I trust has recommended it.
  • I won’t read your book because a big-name publisher has printed it. I’ll read it because someone I trust has reviewed, or recommended, it.
  • I won’t watch a TV show because a television network pubs it. I’ll watch it because someone I trust encourages me to do so.
  • I won’t buy a product because an advertisement sells me, but because you, whom I trust, “sells” me on it.

Trust is rooted in relationship

And there are a few things you can work on to build trust in others. You can build the same trust you’re looking for in others.
  • Social media interaction helps engender trust.
  • Real, offline relationships help engender trust.
  • Consistently helpful information engenders trust.
  • Honesty engenders trust.
  • Vulnerability engenders trust.

If the next generation of writers, communicators, and leaders wants to be effective, they’ll learn to develop trust, not just rely on content. And trust is rooted in a relationship.

In a culture of information saturation, we’re looking for a reason to follow someone’s lead.

Pastors:

Are you finding this to be true in your church?

 *Photo Credit: Creative Commons user Polježičanin’s

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • RSS

Ben Reed

Posts Twitter Facebook

Christ follower, husband, father, writer, small groups pastor at Saddleback Community Church. Communications director for the Small Group Network.
  • http://www.arnyslight.wordpress.com Arnyslight

    I’m not a pastor but I can sure relate to what you are saying…

    when it all comes down too it….in every aspect of life….

    It’s all about the relationships….always…

    Jesus preached the heck out of himself…and performed miracles left and right….

    Be he made time to make relationships….(even those we don’t see fit, like prostitues, tax collectors, and theives)

    Relationships is what change people….

    • http://www.benreed.net Ben Reed

      Yes…agree completely, Arny!

  • http://www.jasonvana.com Jason Vana

    I see this all the time working with youth, young adults and university students. The only way to effectively reach them is through relationship. Many are burnt out on church, on lectures, on stagnant and distant authority telling them what to do. But when you build trust with them, connect with them through dinner or hanging out, they are much more willing to trust. 

    • http://www.benreed.net Ben Reed

      You’re so right, Jason. So much is built on relationships.